Somerville Open Studios 2018

Disappointing, I didn’t sell any of my actual art. I sold enough earrings, necklaces to cover the fee, plus some. This is when the negative thoughts start. No one likes my work, it’s no good. I’m wasting my time……  Please feel free to disagree!

There were some enthusiastic viewers and some positive reactions, for example a woman was looking at the series I did for Valentines day made with a red circuit board behind laser cut hearts in wildly colored collaged wood. She said “Oh these are great, I work in Pulmonary Medicine.”  “Would look great in your office” said I, to no avail. I offered the small piece for a discount of $20 and she still didn’t take it.

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Turns out pulmonary is lungs not hearts (cardiac) … but she brought it up!

Melissa Glick makes 3D collage out of old computer parts. Her studio is at The Artisan’s Asylum, a 40K sq. foot “Maker Space” in Somerville, MA. Her work has been described as being “structural poetry”. Visit her website and Etsy shop to see more of her work.

www.hackercreations.com

www.etsy.com/shop/hackercreations

Open Call: HackCycle Deadline for Submissions: May 25th

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The Nave Gallery (Somerville, MA) invites artists to participate in the curated exhibition, HackCycle.

HackCycle celebrates recycled art of the 21st century. We invite submissions from  artists, nerds, makers, burners and others who employ experimentation and serendipity using today’s technological debris and/or innovative techniques as part of their creative process.

The exhibition examines the transformation of bits, bytes, cruft, e-waste, circuits, doodads, odds & ends and more into objects of art. Work may (but is not limited to) demonstrate the use of 3D printing, laser cutters and/or CNC bots in combination with found art, assemblage and/or appropriation.

Entries sought may (but are not limited to) include unique and reimagined re-uses of the following elements:

 – robotics
– electronics
– sci fi
– cosplay
– anime, action figure toys & fun childhood memories

GUIDELINES:
– $15 entry fee payable through PayPal

– A maximum of five pieces may be entered for consideration

– Submissions will be accepted through September 8, 2015

– The Nave Gallery will retain a 30% commission for work sold

– Artist is responsible for cost of shipping work to and from the gallery

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR WORK:
-Send up to five artwork submissions as .jpg files to info@navegallery.org.

-Each .jpg should be 1200 pixels in the long dimension and named as “NAME_#.jpg” where # is the submission number and NAME is your last name

-Include an image list with your jpeg submission email, indicating submission number, title, size, process and year, as well as a brief artist bio and statement

-There is a $15 submission fee, payable through Paypal. Paypal is available here. Please include “HackCycle” in the note field

– Please indicate where you learned of the call

Accepted pieces should be delivered to the Nave Gallery located in Teele Square (155 Powder House Blvd, Somerville, MA) ready to install.

CALENDAR:
Deadline for entries: May 25, 2015
Notification: May 30, 2015
Artwork drop-off: June 7, 2015
Exhibition dates: June 11 – July 11, 2015
Opening reception:  June 11, 2015; 6:00 pm-8:00 pm

ABOUT THE CURATOR:
Melissa Glick is a Boston-based artist and teacher who finds beauty in unexpected places. She creates dynamic compositions with abstract elements and bold colors by combining disassembled computer parts with appropriated imagery and personal relics. In addition to her work being fun and eye catching it address the environmental impact of our technological lifestyle and our emotional attachments to the “things” that represent and validate who we are. Melissa works out of the Artisan’s Asylum and is a proponent of the Maker Movement and the democratization of production. She has a Masters in Art Education from Mass College of Art and a BA from SUNY Purchase and has run educational programs at the Cambridge Multicultural Arts Center, Boston Ballet, Museum of Fine Arts, Watertown Arsenal Center for the Arts, Parts & Crafts and at various community events.  View her work at www.melissasglick.com

Trip to Providence Revisited

I wrote this blog on October 25, 2014 but never finished or published it, until now. Its April 11, 2017….It took 3 years & 4 months to use up the supplies I bought there! So here is the story with updates!

My friend Barbara invited me to go to Wolf E Myrow Inc  a jewelry warehouse in Cranston RI. A place I had heard about but never been so when this co-inmate from the maker space where I work, said she was going, I said, “Take me along!”  Barbara is a retired art teacher, who taught in the Somerville Public Schools for 25 years and she is one of the happiest people I have ever met! Since retiring she has been making and teaching classes in enamel, jewelry and watercolor painting at The Artisan’s Asylum.

Wolf Myrow is in a huge brick warehouse located just off the highway at 46 Aleppo Street, Providence, RI, 02909 It took me an 1 hour to get there driving Barbara’s Subaru Outback from Somerville, MA. (I didnt know then, that I would own a Subaru Outback myself in the future!)  It turns out Wolf Myrow it is very close to another RI fav of mine: Business Surplus is at 204 Hartford Ave, Providence, RI 02909…. that’s another blog.

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When you walk into the huge space, you are told there are 4 more rooms just like it. For someone to has a hard time focusing, you can not imagine the panic this brings on. As I thought, I wasn’t thru with the first room when Barbara said she was ready to go!

There are tall metal shelves filled with brown cardboard boxes as far as the eye can see. The overhead lights are kept off to save electricity, so you have to flick them on for each aisle you want to go down.

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The contents of each box is attached to its front. If you have limited time to explore, I suggest you take a look at their website before going, so that you can determine the general type of things you are looking for. Be aware the website does not represent the actually inventory!

prov10There are 6 different areas. Chains, beads, findings, gems… odds and ends… The catch is its wholesale and  you must spend $50 so its good to go with a friend. And you have to purchase $10 worth of each item. So I now have a life time supply of findings. I plan to bag them up and sell them on etsy or to my fellow inmates at the Artisan’s Asylum.

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Revised post script: I never, bagged up or sold any excess. I gave some away to people who needed them. It turned out, my rushed decisions turn out to be lucky accidents. The load of necklace hooks I bought, consisted of a hook and jump ring. I didn’t turn out using many of the hooks but, I unattached the rings and used them all up and now I need to go back to get more!!!!

Who wants to go?

 

 

A Celebration of Electronics

When I first learned about the phone box project in Somerville, Ma, I immediately saw a vortex of motherboards, closing in from four

tylerbox_web copy

sides….reminding me of the force and speed of technical advancement that has relegated the old telephone to a thing of the past…… Six months later I see this and I love love love it! For a split second there was a feeling like someone had stolen my idea, my thunder…. but when I read the description I saw how much….. knows about engineering and said things I didnt know how to say!

So I searched him out, and friended him AND he wrote me back!We have a tentative date to meet up to swap ideas! How great is that! I love Somerville and the Artisan’s Asylum.  I hope something can be done to insure they continue to exist! Somerville must plan ahead if they want to preserve the kind of community that supports and nurtures creative collaboration. Planning Board Link goes here.

Tyler Hutchison: A Celebration of Electronics

In our digital world, I feel it is important to remember and celebrate our analog electronics. While digital electronics offer convenient, neatly packaged chunks of information, our world is analog. Information arrives to our senses continuo

usly. Since our eyes and ears are imperfect sensors, digital electronics can model and mimic continuous information, but if our eyes were better, we could see the pixels or the 60 Hz refresh rate on a computer monitor. If our ears were better, we could hear the individual bits of an mp3. Analog electronics are necessary to interface with the world; they are in power chargers, cell phone antennas, satellites, defibrillators, pressure sensitive touch screens, microwaves, life support systems, cars, smoke alarms, heaters, stereos, somewhere within nearly every electronic we use daily. Analog electronics still deserve, and will continue to deserve, celebration.

In A Celebration of Electronics, the audience consists of transistors which are standing or using op amp and capacitor furniture to take in the show. Vacuum tubes take the center stage and play instruments for their adoring transistor fans. Capacitors and diodes make up the guitar, an ultrasonic transducers drum set keeps the beat, and the lead singer belts melodies into a resistor microphone. Six discrete LEDs above the stage provide concert lighting and the three headphone speakers make up the ‘large’ speaker box stage right. To unite all the components, several printed circuit boards (PCBs) serve as floor, stage, and backdrop.

Asylum Open Studios Dec 2013

I love a deadline! Moving into my space in November with the goal of 10 new pieces was a fun-crazy time! I may not have completed all 10 but I am very satisfied with the results of my productivity.

1. Gears was up in Lowell at the Zeitgeist Gallery.gearsm copy

2. I was still painting the edges of Little Pasha,  at Open Studios, I’m not ready to give that one up… I love having him around….

pinkweavedit3. Pink Weave was finished and I liked the way it turned out.

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4. Vasarelli was purchased by my bestest, oldest friend (along with 2 older ones: Mosaic with Grout & Stators). Karen, my patron,  is supportive,  encouraging & has plenty of walls to adorn in her big beautiful house.

5. Tabs and 6. Silver & Gold received many positive comments but no serious takers. They are both listed on line at Etsy and a new source called Artfully Reimagined This fee-free online market is like Etsy but solely for work made from recycled materials! How awesome is that?

There is 7. Mondrian Triad  and 8. Mod Squad ….. waiting on my bench to be finished are: China, Poka Dots, Peruvian Doll and Blue Stars. That would’ve been 11!

I took the advice and started making earrings and they sold very well. Since my attempts at resin were unsuccessful, I just started adding jump loops to the collection of laser readers I had saved up. (image)

It was lucky to find silver and copper colored jump rings at Building 19 a few months ago. (a real bargain store here in MA – unfortunately soon to be out of business:<) The rings that are like paper clips can be slipped the laser readers and other delicate parts to  make earrings and necklaces of various designs.

With the magic of luck (preparation, inspiration, & foresight), saving interesting pieces with an organized system, I just popped the pieces together and now they are dangling off the ears and necks of some very groovy young women! Thank goodness for holiday shoppers!

I updated the quilt image on a couple magnets and added pins to 2 small ones for broaches.  A woman who saw my work atmagnetsdec9 the Open House, later contacted me thru the etsy page and requested 6 to give to her staff. Now what a nice holiday gift for a “techie” company. There are so many of those here in Cambridge, MA. I just need to find a way to get the word out to them.

I think the 12 earrings, 8 necklaces and 15 magnets more than make up for the original goal……also what ever didn’t sell is coming to Vegas in August to the ultimate hacker convention: Def Com! (I hope!)

April Fools Day Surprise

I sold my first two pieces off Etsy and it was NO joke! I am so so happy! I am over the moon! A guy from San Jose bought my Bauhaus and the Gear Clock. He said he’s opening a restaurant Imageand my work would fit well in Silicon Valley. The funny thing was, the Gear Clock was actually not even available. I was tempting fate by listing it for sale. I made that Gear Clock for my Secret Santa at the Artisan’s Asylum (https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=528099703880529&set=pb.161850317172138.-2207520000.1365097449&type=3&theater).  But I whipped up another one, which was even better!  I thought I had learned the best method with the first one, but the 2nd one was a whole new struggle. NOW, hopefully the 3rd one will come easier.  The Gear Clocks are a combination of bike gears, motherboards with the cut out circle which many others have found to be the perfect size. (This  etsy guy sold 1000 of them!https://www.etsy.com/listing/117995468/circuit-board-alarm-clock-from-recycled?ref=usr_faveitems)  [Tangient google searching recycled computer art].

ImageBauhaus really pops! It is a small piece with a multi-level collage in blue and green. The story of this piece involves an image I cut out of a used Art History book 20 years ago….an image from one of my Dad’s old Scientific American magazines from the 70’s podged onto a large laminate sample from Home Depot and a big shiny copper inductor probably from a small hard drive. The similar colors of early modernism and the schematic gravitated together in the “pool” of my collection at the right place at the right time. I’m happy I could bring these 2 together and find them a new home all the way across the country in California…. Farewell my children be well!

Repurpose

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Blue Polaroid

Arc Works Community Art Center 22 Foster St Peabody, MA 01960

Opening Reception: April 25 4:30 – 7:30 – Dates: 4/18-5/31

Repurpose

Here in America, computers and electronics are everywhere. Imagine your day without motors. Already this morning, I have brushed my teeth, turned on the dishwasher, talked on my phone and now I’m typing on my computer. Inside of all these tools are a multitude of parts you never see. When I take things apart, I am amazed at the variety of unusual shapes, colors and materials that are combined to make things work.  I’m not an engineer or a scientist, so I don’t understand how energy is stored up in copper wires and how intermittent pulses cause changes in voltage.  Instead I see jagged edged plastic gears and shiny asymmetrical pieces of metal that call out to me to be reassembled into art.

It feels like technology was born just about the same time I was, and it has been growing like bacteria, exponentially ever since. Computers make everything move faster, technology is advancing faster, gadgets are getting smaller and faster. Clunky old monitors and computers, outdated stereos and cameras are thrown away like garbage.  We are drowning in E-waste!

In my mosaics, I focus on the abstract beauty of the parts. As I disassemble a PC, printer or scanner I think about the person who designed each piece to fulfill a specific purpose.  I envision the assembly line in the factory and the repetitive, mindless labor. I marvel at my luck and appreciation for the opportunity I have to use my imagination to see the beauty in these mass produced objects. For my desire (compulsion, need, calling) to transform them into works of art, that get people’s attention and make them think about all of these things too.

My work is a convergence of circumstances: a father’s pleasure in accumulating obsolete materials from Raytheon; an inherited disposition to seeing beauty and value in old, unwanted refuse; a belief and education in art as a valuable shared expression; and being in the right place at the right time for it to have meaning.