Getting Work Out There

It’s only October but I am getting into the spirit of giving.   I’m giving my work to people who will hang them in public spaces. A while back, I heard about an acquaintance who offered her work for free to anyone who wanted it. The following week, she received good fortune including a commission!monstermike

Whenever I walked past Monster Mikes Guitars at 869A Mass Ave. up the street from where I live in Central Sq, Cambridge MA., I noticed an empty space in the window. So I just went in, introduced myself and asked if could put my piece there and he said sure. So if you’re in the area check out Tango in Mustard. I also encourage you to patronize this fine establishment.

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Tango in Mustard, 2015

This Hacker Creation is a 3D collage of recycled paper, wood, and computer parts – a collection of abstract shapes and patterns unified by the “pea soup” color of the old circuit boards on the top. Press the button and the “muffin fans” spin.    The composition combines intricate details from a collection of traditional decorative patterns and an image of dancers painted by John Grillo (from a brochure I picked up at a gallery in Welfleet years ago) with disassembled and surplus parts from old technology. The appropriated image is mounted on a metal hard drive cover and framed by a grid from the plastic flexi-sheet (from under the keyboard keys.) Batteries and wiring are sandwiched between two boards, clipped together with improvised metal parts.

Mario and Metal Weave

Mario of CLM Mechanics 366 Webster St Cambridge, MA 

My mechanic is a great guy, I’ve known him for years and consider him a friend. Today I had to get new brakes on my car and when I picked it up, I gave Mario, Metal Weave to hang in his newly refurbished office/waiting room. I think he liked it. The piece has a lot of silver metal, black plastic and features an old vacuum tube and fits in amidst the car parts, tools and lifts. I’m not going to plug Mario’s garage because it is always too crowded and I like to think it’s my little secret. I doubt they have a website.

My goal is to increase my audience by getting my work out into the world.  When people stumble upon it, I hope they will have time to take in the variety of shapes and materials. Get a sense of the balance, composition and patterns. Its a non-verbal thing, if it brings you pleasure then, you get it!

I take pictures of everyone who buys one of my pieces. My audience may be limited and perhaps a collection of odd ducks, but when they say, ” I love it”, I know they are telling me the truth. It is such a thrill when people “get it”, confirming that we share a way of seeing beauty in unusual places.

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Working in my studio
Photo by: Anna Muench

The recycle loop has three steps: 1. I keep materials out out of the waste system. 2. They are transformed, given new life as art. 3. When you hang it on your wall at home/office to enjoy.  Be a part of the Recycle loop! Visit my Shop at: www.etsy.com/shop/hackercreations

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Melissa Glick  • Hacker Creations    •  glick.melissa@gmail.com  •   Working from The Artisan’s Asylum, Somerville, MA since 2013.

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A Celebration of Electronics

When I first learned about the phone box project in Somerville, Ma, I immediately saw a vortex of motherboards, closing in from four

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sides….reminding me of the force and speed of technical advancement that has relegated the old telephone to a thing of the past…… Six months later I see this and I love love love it! For a split second there was a feeling like someone had stolen my idea, my thunder…. but when I read the description I saw how much….. knows about engineering and said things I didnt know how to say!

So I searched him out, and friended him AND he wrote me back!We have a tentative date to meet up to swap ideas! How great is that! I love Somerville and the Artisan’s Asylum.  I hope something can be done to insure they continue to exist! Somerville must plan ahead if they want to preserve the kind of community that supports and nurtures creative collaboration. Planning Board Link goes here.

Tyler Hutchison: A Celebration of Electronics

In our digital world, I feel it is important to remember and celebrate our analog electronics. While digital electronics offer convenient, neatly packaged chunks of information, our world is analog. Information arrives to our senses continuo

usly. Since our eyes and ears are imperfect sensors, digital electronics can model and mimic continuous information, but if our eyes were better, we could see the pixels or the 60 Hz refresh rate on a computer monitor. If our ears were better, we could hear the individual bits of an mp3. Analog electronics are necessary to interface with the world; they are in power chargers, cell phone antennas, satellites, defibrillators, pressure sensitive touch screens, microwaves, life support systems, cars, smoke alarms, heaters, stereos, somewhere within nearly every electronic we use daily. Analog electronics still deserve, and will continue to deserve, celebration.

In A Celebration of Electronics, the audience consists of transistors which are standing or using op amp and capacitor furniture to take in the show. Vacuum tubes take the center stage and play instruments for their adoring transistor fans. Capacitors and diodes make up the guitar, an ultrasonic transducers drum set keeps the beat, and the lead singer belts melodies into a resistor microphone. Six discrete LEDs above the stage provide concert lighting and the three headphone speakers make up the ‘large’ speaker box stage right. To unite all the components, several printed circuit boards (PCBs) serve as floor, stage, and backdrop.